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Birding Events Press Releases

Birds and Bagels, Sat., May 23

Lacawac Sanctuary
Lacawac Sanctuary is a hotspot for a diverse population of bird species. Join Northeast Pennsylvania’s Audubon Society naturalists on a walk to identify the birds we see and hear. Field marks, songs, behaviors and flight patterns are all characteristics that can lead to a proper identification. The expert birders from the NEPA Audubon Society and other naturalist professionals will help us identify species to record on eBird, a citizen science site used by researchers tracking bird populations and migrations. Enjoy a handsome breakfast at the lodge after the walk. $15 per person; $10 for members. Register by calling (570) 689-9494 or email info@lacawac.org.

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Birding Events Press Releases

Bird Walk at Florence Shelly Preserve
Sat. May 16th

Florence Shelly Preserve (Photo: Nature Conservancy)

Join David Trently on a search for birds, and other wildlife, through the woodlands and wetlands of the Florence Shelly Preserve, a Nature Conservancy property one mile north of the borough of Thompson, on Route 171, in rural Susquehanna County. Meet at the Stack Road entrance to the preserve by 8:00 a.m. For directions and more information about the Preserve, please see the following website: http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/unitedstates/pennsylvania/placesweprotect/florence-shelly-preserve.xml

The walk is open to all – young and old, regardless of wildlife viewing experience – and will involve relatively easy, slow-paced walking of a little more than a mile along the trails. A portion of the walk will be uphill, but it is along a gentle slope. Binoculars and cameras are recommended, and you should bring water along as well.

At this time of year, most of the nesting species should be actively maintaining their nests, so there should be plenty of birds to see and hear. Some of the species we will be looking for include Black-capped Chickadee, Alder Flycatcher, Blue-headed Vireo, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Veery, Hermit Thrush, Gray Catbird, Swamp Sparrow, Scarlet Tanager, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Indigo Bunting, Bobolink and Purple Finch. In addition, there are several species of warblers (small songbirds that are a real treat for birders to watch) that nest here, including Ovenbird, Northern Waterthrush, Blue-winged Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, American Redstart, Yellow Warbler, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler and Canada Warbler. As we walk the trails, there is always a good chance we could see Ruffed Grouse, as well as White-tailed Deer.

During the walk, David will also point out other interesting wildlife, like butterflies, dragonflies and wildflowers.

Here are just a few of the many colorful birds we may see!

Cape May Warbler
Cape May Warbler
Scarlet Tanager
Scarlet Tanager
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
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Birding Conservation Events Press Releases

Join in the Annual Pennsylvania Migration Count

Birdwatching

The 2015 Pennsylvania Migration Count will be held on Saturday, May 9, 2015.

The Pennsylvania Migration Count (PAMC) was established to gather annual data on migratory bird populations, and to help answer some fundamental questions regarding their distribution throughout Pennsylvania. PAMC is an annual one-day snapshot of bird populations within our state attempting to answer which species are present, where are they and how many there are? Detecting the changes in population will help give us an early warning of possible declines and it is hoped that steps can be taken toward assisting their future survival. In many ways, the PAMC is similar to the Christmas Bird Count (CBC), with the exception that it is county-based.

Results from the count are compiled across the state and published in Pennsylvania Birds, our state ornithological journal.

Can you join us in covering Wayne County?

It’s a great way to spend International Migratory Bird Day! Birders of all skill levels can help out with the count. Beginning at midnight with the songs of the Whip-poor-wills (if we’re lucky!) and the hooting of the Great Horned Owls, the PAMC is a great way to spend time outside. Whether you tally birds in your backyard, at your feeders, the local little league ballfield, along the river, on a lake, at your camp or spend time hiking through a state park, your observations count. While observations can be made over a 24-hour period, it’s up to you to decide how much time you will contribute.

More information about the PAMC can be found on our Citizen Science page. If you are interested in participating, please contact Chris Fischer at cfischer17@gmail.com.